USB type c connect monitor

ASUS ZenScreen MB14AC. Portable Monitor with USB Type-C

type, connect, monitor

Interesting monitors do not appear on the market very often, and portable models are rarely produced at all. Today, June 24, 2020, the range of monitors has been replenished with one new model of a portable type, that is, one that is capable of fully working without being connected to an electrical network or other power sources. The novelty is called ASUS ZenScreen MB14AC, and it can be used in tandem with laptops, tablets, game consoles, personal computers and any other gadgets. The novelty costs little, has an attractive appearance, and also boasts some other advantages. The official sales of such a device will begin in the summer, that is, in the next two months, but there are no details on this yet.

One of the main features of this portable battery is that it is equipped with a symmetrical USB Type-C port, which is used SIMultaneously to transfer power to the monitor for its operation, as well as for signal transmission. Due to this, you can, for example, SIMply connect the monitor to a laptop on Windows, Linux or macOS, as soon as it becomes possible to use it as an additional one. You need to understand that the monitor cannot consume such energy as its counterparts plugged into an outlet, so its technical equipment may not seem the most modern, but it is SIMply impossible to fit something more advanced into such a compact case now. The device has a 14-inch IPS-display with a resolution of 1920 by 1080 pixels (Full HD) with a refresh rate of 60 Hz.

The brightness is 250 cd / m2, and the contrast is at 700: 1. Viewing angles vertically and horizontally reach 178 degrees, making the picture look extremely attractive from any angle. Due to the fact that the response time of the matrix is ​​only 5 ms, you can even play games on such a portable monitor. The package includes a protective cover ASUS Smart Case, which protects it during transport, and, in addition, it is also used as a stand. With its help, the portable monitor can be placed both horizontally and vertically, which can be extremely convenient for developers. The new product called ZenScreen MB14AC was not without modern cutting-edge technologies.

This display tool is equipped with Blue Light Filter technology, which reduces harmful blue light to the eyes, protecting the head from possible side effects. Flicker Free technology eliminates display flickering, which is also harmful to the eyes. The dimensions of this portable monitor are 324.94 x 208.03 x 11.2 mm, and it weighs about 590 grams. Official sales of ASUS ZenScreen MB14AC will begin in the near future, but even the approximate price is unknown. From the experience of the models of previous generations, one can only notice that they cost 200. 300 at the start of sales, therefore, the new model, most likely, will be quite affordable in terms of cost. It will be available in dark gray.

Top 5 benefits of using a USB-C monitor Why USB in the monitor?

First, the USB-C connector can replace HDMI or DisplayPort. This solution is extremely convenient, especially for people who use a laptop but want to connect to a monitor in the office. In such a situation, they just need to connect a small USB-C cable to the monitor. Thanks to this, the image from the computer will be sent to the monitor, which can power the laptop.

USB office monitors are often also equipped with USB hubs to which you can connect a mouse, keyboard, or additional peripheral accessories. Thus, the user does not waste time on tedious preparation of the workplace. Instead, all you have to do is connect your laptop to a monitor using a USB-C cable and all your devices will start working right away. In addition, if your screen is equipped with an Ethernet connector, you can easily connect to the Internet. Thus, one cable replaces several others.

USB-C is also useful for combining multiple monitors into a multi-screen work environment. In this case, it is enough to connect several monitors with a DisplayPort cable, and connect a computer to one of them using the aforementioned USB-C. Thanks to this, you get a comfortable working environment without having to connect a lot of cables to the video card. This type of connection is called a daisy chain, which is a wiring diagram that connects multiple devices together.

Transfer video, data and power with one cable

USB-C has a significant impact on how we all use our Smart TVs and devices. There are great benefits for consumers and their daily lives, in particular the bundling of multiple cords. power, data and specialized types. into one cord.

In addition, the latest USB Type-C connections can transfer data at speeds of 20 gigabits per second (Gbps) and deliver more than 100 watts of power sustainably. This is far above the normal power delivery compared to previous USB charging standards, which could only work with compatible devices and only gave 2.5W.

However, this is not the ultimate ceiling for USB-C performance, thanks to the powerful technology and Intel Thunderbolt ports. It enhances the capacity of Type C to transfer data at speeds up to 40 Gbps and support multiple devices.

In addition to delivering high quality output, these features make your USB-C display more portable and easier to use.

Thunderbolt 3 provides access to both PCI Express (PCIe) and DisplayPort signals, and built-in Alternate Modes ensure that USB-C provides everything you need for high-quality streaming. With Alternate Modes and the correct connection, you can actually output HDMI, DisplayPort, VGA, and many other supported formats.

Essentially, a USB Type-C monitor is ready to support high quality images right out of the box. You might not have realized that you can even use the USB-C port as a dedicated headphone jack. You can SIMply use your legacy pair with an adapter, or opt for newer USB-C headphones.

Why USB Monitor. What You Need to Know About USB Monitors

Considering that USB-C is now the default input in recent Apple laptops, and an increasing number of Windows 10 computers are migrating to this port as well, USB-C monitors are gaining in popularity among professionals and designers.

What’s more, it’s really easy to see why monitors with USB-C are so popular: it offers a number of useful advantages over a monitor without this connector.

Connect laptops and USB-C devices without an adapter

Easy access to the most modern devices is another undeniable advantage of the USB Type-C monitor. Why would you want to store extra cords and adapters when you don’t need to? This is a big plus for offices and public places where quick and easy access is important.

It also cuts down on accessories costs because your peripherals only depend on one type of I / O, not half a dozen or more. This means fewer adapters need to be purchased to fit into the workplace.

But, if you really need an interface for older devices or other output formats, you can cover most of your needs with a compact USB-C multiport adapter.

Smaller and easier to use connection type

Anyone familiar with computers before the advent of USB-C will probably appreciate this new format. The first change you’ll notice is the smaller size compared to legacy ports such as USB Type A or the misnamed micro variants with their oversized backing.

USB-C is smaller than previous generations and is much easier to use for anything that requires regular plugging and unplugging. This is largely due to the more comfortable physical configuration.

USB-C is small enough to be comfortable to use with a smartphone or tablet, but powerful enough for a number of other functions. This helps reduce planning and design that was previously required due to lack of port standardization.

One single universal USB-C port potentially replaces half a dozen or more ports on a device.

Another key advantage of the Type C design is that the port is symmetrical, which is a big improvement over Type A and its other predecessors. In short, this symmetry means the USB-C cable can be inserted in any way. You no longer need to worry about which path is active and whether you have the correct connector when you need to use it with other devices or just want to reconnect. With a USB-C monitor, this means slightly less stress.

Conveniently charge other external devices

The possibilities for charging devices are another key benefit of a standardized single-cord solution for data and power. If you hate the clutter caused by cords, or SIMply want the best central solution for charging your devices, a USB-C monitor is a great solution.

Since the USB-C display can put out 100W for charging devices, there is much more to it than with older standards, even with the latest USB 3.0. This is why many newer laptop models have ditched dedicated power cords in favor of USB-C. As a result, you can say goodbye to the traditional power cord, which is often cumbersome and not fun to travel with.

With USB-C, you can connect a display to a laptop or vice versa. Casting from laptop to display is much easier without the extra power cord or adapter. This is also a great feature for USB-C monitors deployed in office settings as the setup process is greatly SIMplified.

Standard for most new devices

While we’ve discussed how much more popular USB-C is becoming, we’ve only looked at some of the results of this trend. As we see USB-C being used more and more, a monitor with this connector is a good place to start using this technology.

However, the transition to USB-C is still a little more difficult than just buying a new device. Often we replace items as they age, but moving to USB-C means it’s important to carefully manage our devices. Otherwise, you risk getting confused with the accessories. Or worse, buy the wrong product for the rest of your media or office suite.

For now, bundling cords and joints is still an important step towards improving usability. This allows manufacturers to create smaller, more efficient devices, as combining legacy ports saves space when redesigning a laptop. With Fewer Ports, Engineers Can Build Thinner Laptops or Install Better Hardware.

In short, USB-C is meant to replace a range of connections, not just the Type A connections we use the most.

There are many reasons to upgrade to a USB-C monitor. This usually means that you will get a performance boost, but more importantly, you will be ahead of the changes that could potentially affect much of what you are already doing.

DisplayLink Manager software

All control of the USB video adapter is carried out through a special program. DisplayLink Manager.

Its latest version can be downloaded from the official DisplayLink website at the link. In addition to Microsoft Windows, MacOS, Android, Ubuntu and Chromebook operating systems are supported.

I have Windows 7, so I chose this system. Before downloading, you need to click on the “Accept” button to confirm your agreement with the license agreement. After that, the download should start. Run the installation of the downloaded file with a double click.

During installation, the program will ask you to connect a USB video adapter to your computer.

In Windows Device Manager, the USB video adapter appears as USB Display Adapters (USB-DVI).

After installing DisplayLink Manager, its icon will appear in the tray. Here is such.

Using this program, you can control the USB video adapter: enable, disable, change the resolution to additional. monitor, rotate the screen, expand the screen on different sides. There are quite a few settings.

I’ll tell you about some of the features of the DisplayLink Manager utility that may come in handy.

By default, DisplayLink Manager launches when the computer is turned on. This is convenient as the desktop immediately expands to an additional monitor.

But, there are times when an additional monitor is not needed for operation. Then it can be turned off.

To disable the additional monitor, left-click on the DisplayLink Manager icon in the tray. In this case, the program menu should appear.

Select item 2.USB-DVI. “Disable”. In this case, the monitors will blink briefly, and the indicator on the USB-DVI adapter will go out.

This will turn off the USB video adapter and enter sleep mode on the secondary monitor. For me, for example, the second monitor of the BenQ FP93G brand went to the duty room with a slight delay, but, as I understand it, it depends on the monitor itself. Dell monitor P2217h went to duty immediately after disconnecting the adapter.

To turn on the additional monitor again, do the same operation as when turning off the monitor, but this time select the “Expand” item. This.

In this case, the main screen will briefly blink, and the indicator on the USB-DVI adapter will light up. The desktop will again be extended to an additional monitor.

If necessary, you can expand the desktop to the right / left, as well as top or bottom relative to the main one. For example, I have my desktop extended on the right, but someone might need a different configuration.

If you expand the desktop from above or below relative to the main one, then you may encounter this. Move the mouse to add. the monitor can only be within the border of the width of the second monitor. For example, the width in pixels of the main monitor is 1920 pixels, and the second is 1024.

In this case, if you move the mouse at the top / bottom edge within 1024 pixels, then you can easily move the mouse cursor to the second monitor. If you move the mouse pointer further than 1024 pixels, then you will not be able to move it to the second monitor. Such is the feature.

For those who have a monitor that allows you to change the position of the screen, the option “Screen rotation” may be useful.

When changing the screen orientation from landscape to portrait, SIMply select the item “Screen Rotation” in the DisplayLink Manager menu and then one of four options to choose from.

You can rotate the image to the right or left. Turning step 90 0.

If you select “Flip”, then the image on the monitor screen will be displayed “upside down”. When you select “Standard Album”, the image on the screen will take a standard view, which is the default.

On the second tab of the menu there is an item “Screen resolution”. Through it you can set the screen resolution of the second monitor. Usually the program independently determines the nominal resolution of the additional monitor, but, if required, it can be set manually. It was detected automatically for me. No further action required.

If you select Use this monitor as primary, the secondary monitor becomes the primary. The taskbar will appear on its screen. This can be useful if the secondary monitor has a higher resolution and you work primarily within the boundaries of its screen.

The item “Create a copy” duplicates the image of the main screen on the second monitor. What I didn’t like about this mode is that the image resolution on both screens gets smaller, and its proportions and positioning on the screen change.

Apparently, this mode is used in conjunction with projectors. I don’t need him.

The item “Fit to TV screen” can be useful in cases where the USB video adapter is used in conjunction with an LCD TV. In some cases, even if the video adapter works correctly with the TV, there are black margins on its screen at the edges. You can correct the position by adjusting the image manually.

To do this, select the item “Fit to TV screen” and adjust the image on the TV screen so that it occupies the entire screen.

A red frame will appear on the LCD TV screen, the edges of which can be moved using the “” and “-” buttons in the “Fit to TV” window. Configure and click the “Apply” button.

There are two items in the main DisplayLink Manager menu: “Sound Setting” and “Advanced Configuration”.

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Clicking on the “Sound Settings” item opens the standard Windows “Sound” settings window, which is available along the “Control Panel” path. “Sound”.

The fact is that some USB video adapters also support audio signal transmission, for example, via HDMI. Therefore, the program has a sound setting item.

The situation is SIMilar with the item “Advanced configuration”, which SIMply refers to the tab of system settings Windows screen resolution (“Control Panel.” “All Control Panel Items.” “Screen”. “Screen Resolution”).

You can find out the version of DisplayLink Manager by clicking on “DisplayLink Manager” at the top of the main menu.

If there is a new version of the program, it is better to download and install it, since errors in newer versions can be eliminated.

During the operation of the USB video adapter, some of them came to light. It is very rare for a video driver to fail. Solved by reboot. Sometimes this is not required, the video driver restores its work automatically.

Another “glitch” that was revealed when using the video adapter is the hang of the program, the window of which was on the additional screen. monitor. Hangs occur when disconnecting USB video adapter via DisplayLink Manager menu.

Basically, this is how the Media Player Classic freezes when playing a video. Perhaps this is a feature of the player itself. It was solved by forced closing Media Player Classic and restarting it.

How to connect a second monitor via USB?

When working at a computer, a second monitor is sometimes required. But there are times when the computer does not have the required D-Sub (VGA) or DisplayPort video output. For example, the candy bar may not have it, as it happened in my case.

Naturally, many are wondering if it is possible to connect a monitor via USB?

As it turned out, a variety of USB video adapters with VGA / HDMI / DVI output or combined are available for sale. In addition, there are adapters that only work with USB2.0, and there are those that support both USB3.0 and the outdated USB2.0.

After a short search, I settled on USB video adapters based on DisplayLink technology.

The essence of such a USB video adapter is as follows. A program and driver (in this case, DisplayLink Manager) is installed on the computer, which has access to the resources of the central processing unit (CPU) and video card (GPU).

The video stream to the second monitor is compressed and transmitted via USB to a decompressor, a specialized microcircuit that is built into the adapter itself. This microcircuit performs decompression of the signal received via USB and displays the picture on another monitor.

As you can see, this involves the CPU resources of the computer itself, which compresses the video signal. However, it can be quite heavily loaded. If the picture on the additional monitor is not updated, then no compression and processor load occurs, since the control program constantly monitors changes on the screen.

The USB video adapter itself is powered via the USB bus (5V) and does not require an external power supply, which is very convenient.

On the official website of DisplayLink in the section “Products using DisplayLink Technology”, you can see the list of manufactured devices. Among others there are USB video adapters and USB monitors.

The range of manufactured USB video adapters is quite extensive. Basically, devices differ in the supported type of USB interface (2.0 / 3.0) and the maximum allowable resolution of the output image. Typically, USB2.0 devices support up to Full HD (1920 x 1080) resolution, while USB3.0 devices can display up to 4K (3840 x 2160) resolution.

To work with my monoblock, I bought a PLUGABLE UGA-165 USB video adapter, or rather, a copy of it.

As it turned out, an exact copy of the PLUGABLE UGA-165 model is being sold on Aliexpress for a fairly low price. He took it. Here’s what’s included.

This is the so-called Single Display Adapter, that is, an adapter for one monitor. There are adapters for two, three monitors and full docking stations, to which you can connect several additional high-resolution monitors.

I chose a suitable video adapter quite carefully. It was required that it work over the USB2.0 interface and have different types of VGA / HDMI / DVI video outputs. This would allow, on occasion, to connect any monitor or LCD TV.

In addition, I really wanted to get a picture on the screen with the highest possible resolution (HD Ready, or better Full HD).

The set included two additional adapters for the standard 15-pin VGA (aka D-SUB) and HDMI connectors. This will allow the video adapter to be used in conjunction with new LCD TVs and monitors, which are increasingly equipped with an HDMI input.

For completeness, I will show a photo of the insides of the video adapter.

Here is a printed circuit board with not many elements.

Bottom view of the seal.

Onboard BGA chip DL-165 belonging to the second generation of DisplayLink specialized processors.

Points to Consider When Choosing a USB Video Adapter?

First, you need to know which version of USB (2.0 or 3.0 / 2.0) the video adapter will work with. For example, my monoblock SIMply does not have USB3.0 connectors, so I chose a video adapter that supports an older version of the interface (USB2.0).

If your computer has a modern USB3.0 connector, then it is better to take a video adapter with USB3.0 support. Some of the USB video adapters support both USB3.0 and USB2.0 interface versions. But here it is worth understanding that the bandwidth of the USB2.0 interface is low, and it will not be able to display a picture with a resolution greater than Full HD (1920 x 1080) on the monitor. This is the “ceiling” for him.

Another thing is USB3.0, the bandwidth of which is enough for multiple monitors with high resolution.

The second thing to consider is what kind of video connector the USB video adapter will have. If standard VGA is enough for you, then you can get the cheapest video adapter. Newer monitors support the newer HDMI and DisplayPort interfaces. Therefore, you should think ahead and take something newer. Or a video adapter that is equipped with all these connectors, as in my case.

The third thing to consider is that USB video transfer technology uses the resources of the central processing unit (CPU) to compress the image. At the same time, it is quite heavily loaded.

If you have a weak processor based computer Atom or Celeron, then, perhaps, you will face the fact that with a dynamically changing picture on the second monitor, the computer will “freeze”, since it may not have enough resources.

Here is a screenshot for an example. Loading the Intel Core2 Quad Q8400 (2.6GHz) processor of my all-in-one when outputting a video player to the second monitor, which plays a movie with a resolution of 1920 x 1080 (Full HD). As you can see, the load is at least 14

fifteen%. This is provided that no other processes are running on the computer.

If you move the video player window to the screen of the main monitor, then the load on the processor drops sharply and remains at level 3

It is also worth remembering one feature. If the picture on the second monitor is static, that is, it does not change, then there will be no load on the computer’s processor. The image is SIMply displayed on the second monitor from the memory of the USB video adapter itself.

And one more important thing to know about. Cheap models of video adapters based on old processors are suitable only for transferring a mostly static and low-changing image. They are not suitable for fast-paced video games.!

Even when playing high-quality Full HD video, the computer starts to slow down. Therefore, video with a higher resolution and bit rate is best viewed on the main monitor, and the second is used to display low-changing images. For example, use a second monitor for surfing the Internet, viewing documents, etc.

Despite all the advantages, the UGA-165 USB video adapter upset me at first.

After unpacking, I decided to try it out in conjunction with an LCD TV Samsung LE32A430T1. But the TV did not “see” the signal from the adapter point-blank and I did not manage to display the picture on it. I tried everything. I connected both via VGA and HDMI, climbed into the TV settings, changed the resolution. Nothing helped.

To calm down, he explained this stubborn reluctance of the LCD TV to work with a USB video adapter only by the fact that it was already quite old. In addition, in the instructions for the TV, I found a clarification that it does not support SOC synchronization or something like that. Perhaps the reason lies precisely in this.

DisplayPort: Faster, Stronger, Better

DisplayPort has long been the preferred choice of PC enthusiasts, and it’s not hard to see why. DisplayPort 2.0 is capable of up to 80 Gbps throughput, although no devices yet support it and all available 4K monitors are version 1.4 of the standard.

However, DisplayPort 1.4 can support 8K resolution at 60fps with 10-bit color depth, but only with image compression (in this respect, compression is not the same as HDMI 2.0). It is also compatible with flex cable.

The good part about DisplayPort 1.4 is that it supports dynamic metadata in HDR, which means you can use Dolby Vision and HDR10 with more color depth (the monitor will be the limitation here, not the interface). DisplayPort does offer some nice advantages over HDMI 2.0, but this will essentially be the case when the first DisplayPort 2.0 products will hit the market.

How to Connect a 4K Monitor: HDMI, DisplayPort, or USB-C

If you’ve just bought (or are about to) a 4K monitor. you’re probably wondering if it’s better to plug it in via a regular HDMI connector, or in the case of other video inputs, using DisplayPort or USB-C instead to give you an added edge. In this article, we’ll walk you through the pros and cons of connecting a 4K monitor via HDMI or using any of our other video inputs.

Obviously, not all 4K monitors have the same video inputs: there are those that only have one or two HDMI 2.0 connectors and don’t give you any other option, but there are also those that have a wide range of video inputs that will allow you to choose which one for every occasion. what interests you the most. Let’s say the monitor has the most common video inputs today: HDMI, DisplayPort and the new USB-C.

Connecting a 4K monitor via HDMI is always successful

Like it or not, HDMI connection has become the modern standard for video connections, and it would be very strange to see a 4K monitor that doesn’t have one or more inputs with that standard.

HDMI 2.1. It is the latest version of the standard adopted by manufacturers and supports bandwidth up to 48 Gbps, which is more than enough for not only 4K resolution, but also 10K @ 60 FPS with 10-bit color depth. Since we are talking about 4K monitors in this article, HDMI 2.1 and even 2.0, which is more common, is still more than sufficient.

HDMI 2.1 also allows daisy-chaining: connect a PC to a monitor and that monitor to another secondary monitor, instead of connecting both to the PC through different video outputs on the video card. Although there are quite a few monitors that support this technology, the possibility still exists, although you should be aware that the standard currently only allows two monitors to be connected using this method, you cannot add a third.

HDMI 2.1 offers many benefits, but as we mentioned earlier, the most common is that 4K monitors have HDMI 2.0 video inputs. This means that the connector is limited to 4K resolution at 60fps at 8-bit color depth. Also, if you are a gamer you should be aware that HDMI 2.0 does not support FreeSync, HDR content is limited to static metadata (HDR 10 standard) and is not Dolby Vision compatible.

In other words, if you intend to use HDMI with your 4K monitor, we advise you to make sure that the monitor supports the 2.1 standard, because while 2.0 is sufficient for a TV, it is not suitable for a PC and less if it is intended to be used. games.

USB-C, ideal for laptop users

While the USB-C standard has a wide range of possible uses, one is to use a video connector using USB-C Alternate Mode, which is essentially DisplayPort over USB-C. This means that the limitations of this connector are the same as those of DisplayPort, in this case its version 1.4, and you will just have the same specifications, but with a different type of connector.

Of course, one of the reasons you should choose USB-C over HDMI or DisplayPort on your 4K monitor is SIMply because of the SIMplicity and versatility that connection provides, which is especially useful if you have a monitor connected to your laptop. It won’t give you more benefits than DisplayPort because, as we explained, it’s essentially the same but with a different connector, so in your hand you should use the connector that suits you best.

What interface and cable to use to connect a laptop to a monitor?

At this stage, it is very difficult to give any specific and universal recommendations. For the reason that everyone has different laptops and monitors. Therefore, we will consider the most popular connection options. One of them should suit you.

First, look at your laptop. I’ll show you everything using the example of my two laptops. The new but budget Lenovo only has HDMI output. As I already wrote, this is the optimal solution.

The second, older ASUS laptop has the same HDMI digital output and the now obsolete VGA.

What other options could there be?

  • Older laptops can only have VGA output.
  • Rarely, but sometimes laptops have DVI output.
  • On modern gaming laptops, in addition to HDMI, there may also be a mini Display Port.
  • On new ultrabooks (mainly on expensive models) there is no separate output at all for connecting an external monitor. There, a new USB Type-C port is used for these tasks. And since there are very few monitors with USB Type-C input now, you will most likely need an adapter. For example, USB-C. HDMI.

We sorted out the laptop. Now we look at our monitor. What are the connection interfaces there. My monitor has two HDMI inputs and one VGA (D-Sub).

Since I have an HDMI output on my laptop, and the monitor has an HDMI input, then of course I will use this particular interface to connect.

But, as you can imagine, this is not always the case. Consider these options:

  • There is no HDMI input on the monitor. And there are, for example, only DVI and VGA. In this case, you can connect via VGA (if there is such an output on the laptop). But, if the laptop has HDMI, then it is best to use an HDMI to DVI adapter.
  • On a laptop only HDMI, and on a VGA monitor. You can also use an adapter. There are enough of them on the market. But, since VGA is not a digital output, the picture quality may not be very good.

SIMply put, when there are no identical interfaces on both devices, then you need to look towards the adapters. And it’s better not to use outdated VGA in the connection. If possible.

I think we figured out the connection interface. Depending on the selected interface, we need a cable, or an adapter. I have a regular HDMI cable.

Setting up a monitor (second screen) on a Windows 10 laptop

To quickly change the display method, just press the Win P key combination on your laptop keyboard. Or use a dedicated function key. Most often paired with the Fn key.

A menu should appear on the screen, in which you can already select the desired mode.

If these settings are not enough for you, you can open “Display Settings”. Right-clicking on an empty area of ​​the desktop.

There should be two displays.

You can select them and change the parameters for each separately. Including you can change the screen resolution. There you can also choose one of four options for working with two displays.

Everything seems to be SIMple and clear there. I think there is no need to describe each setting item.

Points to Consider When Choosing a USB Video Adapter?

First, you need to know which version of USB (2.0 or 3.0 / 2.0) the video adapter will work with. For example, my monoblock SIMply does not have USB3.0 connectors, so I chose a video adapter that supports an older version of the interface (USB2.0).

If your computer has a modern USB3.0 connector, then it is better to take a video adapter with USB3.0 support. Some of the USB video adapters support both USB3.0 and USB2.0 interface versions. But here it is worth understanding that the bandwidth of the USB2.0 interface is low, and it will not be able to display a picture with a resolution greater than Full HD (1920 x 1080) on the monitor. This is the “ceiling” for him.

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Another thing is USB3.0, the bandwidth of which is enough for multiple monitors with high resolution.

The second thing to consider is what kind of video connector the USB video adapter will have. If standard VGA is enough for you, then you can get the cheapest video adapter. Newer monitors support the newer HDMI and DisplayPort interfaces. Therefore, you should think ahead and take something newer. Or a video adapter that is equipped with all these connectors, as in my case.

The third thing to consider is that USB video transfer technology uses the resources of the central processing unit (CPU) to compress the image. At the same time, it is quite heavily loaded.

If you have a weak processor based computer Atom or Celeron, then, perhaps, you will face the fact that with a dynamically changing picture on the second monitor, the computer will “freeze”, since it may not have enough resources.

Here is a screenshot for an example. Loading the Intel Core2 Quad Q8400 (2.6GHz) processor of my all-in-one when outputting a video player to the second monitor, which plays a movie with a resolution of 1920 x 1080 (Full HD). As you can see, the load is at least 14

fifteen%. This is provided that no other processes are running on the computer.

If you move the video player window to the screen of the main monitor, then the load on the processor drops sharply and remains at level 3

It is also worth remembering one feature. If the picture on the second monitor is static, that is, it does not change, then there will be no load on the computer’s processor. The image is SIMply displayed on the second monitor from the memory of the USB video adapter itself.

And one more important thing to know about. Cheap models of video adapters based on old processors are suitable only for transferring a mostly static and low-changing image. They are not suitable for fast-paced video games.!

Even when playing high-quality Full HD video, the computer starts to slow down. Therefore, video with a higher resolution and bit rate is best viewed on the main monitor, and the second is used to display low-changing images. For example, use a second monitor for surfing the Internet, viewing documents, etc.

Despite all the advantages, the UGA-165 USB video adapter upset me at first.

After unpacking, I decided to try it out in conjunction with an LCD TV Samsung LE32A430T1. But the TV did not “see” the signal from the adapter point-blank and I did not manage to display the picture on it. I tried everything. I connected both via VGA and HDMI, climbed into the TV settings, changed the resolution. Nothing helped.

To calm down, he explained this stubborn reluctance of the LCD TV to work with a USB video adapter only by the fact that it was already quite old. In addition, in the instructions for the TV, I found a clarification that it does not support SOC synchronization or something like that. Perhaps the reason lies precisely in this.

Today we will connect an external monitor to a laptop, netbook, or ultrabook and configure the whole thing in Windows 10 and Windows 7. If you have Windows 8, everything will work out. It’s just that I don’t have this system installed on my laptop, I can’t show everything and take screenshots. In general, in the process of connecting a laptop to a monitor, there is not much difference which version of Windows you have installed. In most cases, you just need to connect the monitor to your laptop via an HDMI cable, or VGA, DVI, USB Type-C. We will also talk about which connection interface is best to use and which cable (possibly an adapter) we need.

My laptop is almost always connected to the monitor. Plus a wireless keyboard and mouse. That is, I have a laptop as a system unit. It is very comfortable. I can turn off my laptop at any time and take it with me. It is virtually silent compared to a PC. And thanks to the monitor that I connect to at home, I can comfortably work on the big screen, watch movies, play, etc.

Besides, the screen quality on laptops is very poor. I will introduce models from the budget and middle price segment. Or old laptops.

Everyone has different tasks. And there can be a lot of cases when we may need to connect a monitor. Someone will connect to a large screen to watch movies, take their laptop to work and connect there to a monitor for more comfortable work, or, like me, use it as a stationary computer. In any case, we need to somehow connect and configure these two devices. By the way, instead of a monitor, you can use a TV.

To begin with, we will find out which connection interface (output) is on our laptop, we will also check if there is the same port (input) on the monitor and already decide which one to use. And of course we need a certain cable. In some cases, an adapter may still be needed.

DisplayLink Manager software

All control of the USB video adapter is carried out through a special program. DisplayLink Manager.

Its latest version can be downloaded from the official DisplayLink website at the link. In addition to Microsoft Windows, MacOS, Android, Ubuntu and Chromebook operating systems are supported.

I have Windows 7, so I chose this system. Before downloading, you need to click on the “Accept” button to confirm your agreement with the license agreement. After that, the download should start. Run the installation of the downloaded file with a double click.

During installation, the program will ask you to connect a USB video adapter to your computer.

In Windows Device Manager, the USB video adapter appears as USB Display Adapters (USB-DVI).

After installing DisplayLink Manager, its icon will appear in the tray. Here is such.

Using this program, you can control the USB video adapter: enable, disable, change the resolution to additional. monitor, rotate the screen, expand the screen on different sides. There are quite a few settings.

I’ll tell you about some of the features of the DisplayLink Manager utility that may come in handy.

By default, DisplayLink Manager launches when the computer is turned on. This is convenient as the desktop immediately expands to an additional monitor.

But, there are times when an additional monitor is not needed for operation. Then it can be turned off.

To disable the additional monitor, left-click on the DisplayLink Manager icon in the tray. In this case, the program menu should appear.

We select item 2.USB-DVI. “Disable”. In this case, the monitors will blink briefly, and the indicator on the USB-DVI adapter will go out.

This will turn off the USB video adapter and enter sleep mode on the secondary monitor. For me, for example, the second monitor of the BenQ FP93G brand went to the duty room with a slight delay, but, as I understand it, it depends on the monitor itself. Dell monitor P2217h went to duty immediately after disconnecting the adapter.

To turn on the additional monitor again, do the same operation as when turning off the monitor, but this time select the “Expand” item. This.

In this case, the main screen will briefly blink, and the indicator on the USB-DVI adapter will light up. The desktop will again be extended to an additional monitor.

If necessary, you can expand the desktop to the right / left, as well as top or bottom relative to the main one. For example, I have my desktop extended on the right, but someone might need a different configuration.

If you expand the desktop from above or below relative to the main one, then you may encounter this. Move the mouse to add. the monitor can only be within the border of the width of the second monitor. For example, the width in pixels of the main monitor is 1920 pixels, and the second is 1024.

In this case, if you move the mouse at the top / bottom edge within 1024 pixels, then you can easily move the mouse cursor to the second monitor. If you move the mouse pointer further than 1024 pixels, then you will not be able to move it to the second monitor. Such is the feature.

For those who have a monitor that allows you to change the position of the screen, the option “Screen rotation” may be useful.

When changing the screen orientation from landscape to portrait, SIMply select the item “Screen Rotation” in the DisplayLink Manager menu and then one of four options to choose from.

You can rotate the image to the right or left. Turning step 90 0.

If you select “Flip”, then the image on the monitor screen will be displayed “upside down”. When you select “Standard Album”, the image on the screen will take a standard view, which is the default.

On the second tab of the menu there is an item “Screen resolution”. Through it you can set the screen resolution of the second monitor. Usually the program independently determines the nominal resolution of the additional monitor, but, if required, it can be set manually. It was detected automatically for me. No further action required.

If you select Use this monitor as primary, the secondary monitor becomes the primary. The taskbar will appear on its screen. This can be useful if the secondary monitor has a higher resolution and you work primarily within the boundaries of its screen.

The item “Create a copy” duplicates the image of the main screen on the second monitor. What I didn’t like about this mode is that the image resolution on both screens gets smaller, and its proportions and positioning on the screen change.

Apparently, this mode is used in conjunction with projectors. I don’t need him.

The item “Fit to TV screen” can be useful in cases where the USB video adapter is used in conjunction with an LCD TV. In some cases, even if the video adapter works correctly with the TV, there are black margins on its screen at the edges. You can correct the position by adjusting the image manually.

To do this, select the item “Fit to TV screen” and adjust the image on the TV screen so that it occupies the entire screen.

A red frame will appear on the LCD TV screen, the edges of which can be moved using the “” and “-” buttons in the “Fit to TV” window. Configure and click the “Apply” button.

There are two items in the main DisplayLink Manager menu: “Sound Setting” and “Advanced Configuration”.

By clicking on the “Sound Settings” item, the standard Windows “Sound” settings window opens, which is available along the path “Control Panel”. “Sound”.

The fact is that some USB video adapters also support audio signal transmission, for example, via HDMI. Therefore, the program has a sound setting item.

The situation is SIMilar with the item “Advanced configuration”, which SIMply refers to the tab of system settings Windows screen resolution (“Control Panel”. “All Control Panel Items”. “Display”. “Screen Resolution”).

You can find out the version of DisplayLink Manager by clicking on “DisplayLink Manager” at the top of the main menu.

If there is a new version of the program, it is better to download and install it, since errors in newer versions can be eliminated.

During the operation of the USB video adapter, some of them came to light. It is very rare for a video driver to fail. Solved by reboot. Sometimes this is not required, the video driver restores its work automatically.

Another “glitch” that was revealed when using the video adapter is the hang of the program, the window of which was on the additional screen. monitor. Hangs occur when disconnecting USB video adapter via DisplayLink Manager menu.

Basically, this is how the Media Player Classic freezes when playing a video. Perhaps this is a feature of the player itself. It was solved by forced closing Media Player Classic and restarting it.

Points to Consider When Choosing a USB Video Adapter?

First, you need to know which version of USB (2.0 or 3.0 / 2.0) the video adapter will work with. For example, my monoblock SIMply does not have USB3.0 connectors, so I chose a video adapter that supports an older version of the interface (USB2.0).

If your computer has a modern USB3.0 connector, then it is better to take a video adapter with USB3.0 support. Some of the USB video adapters support both USB3.0 and USB2.0 interface versions. But here it is worth understanding that the bandwidth of the USB2.0 interface is low, and it will not be able to display a picture with a resolution greater than Full HD (1920 x 1080) on the monitor. This is the “ceiling” for him.

Another thing is USB3.0, the bandwidth of which is enough for multiple monitors with high resolution.

The second thing to consider is what kind of video connector the USB video adapter will have. If standard VGA is enough for you, then you can get the cheapest video adapter. Newer monitors support the newer HDMI and DisplayPort interfaces. Therefore, you should think ahead and take something newer. Or a video adapter that is equipped with all these connectors, as in my case.

The third thing to consider is that USB video transfer technology uses the resources of the central processing unit (CPU) to compress the image. At the same time, it is quite heavily loaded.

If you have a weak processor based computer Atom or Celeron, then, perhaps, you will face the fact that with a dynamically changing picture on the second monitor, the computer will “freeze”, since it may not have enough resources.

Here is a screenshot for an example. Loading the Intel Core2 Quad Q8400 (2.6GHz) processor of my all-in-one when outputting a video player to the second monitor, which plays a movie with a resolution of 1920 x 1080 (Full HD). As you can see, the load is at least 14

fifteen%. This is provided that no other processes are running on the computer.

If you move the video player window to the screen of the main monitor, then the load on the processor drops sharply and remains at level 3

It is also worth remembering one feature. If the picture on the second monitor is static, that is, it does not change, then there will be no load on the computer’s processor. The image is SIMply displayed on the second monitor from the memory of the USB video adapter itself.

And one more important thing to know about. Cheap models of video adapters based on old processors are suitable only for transferring a mostly static and low-changing image. They are not suitable for fast-paced video games.!

Even when playing high-quality Full HD video, the computer starts to slow down. Therefore, video with a higher resolution and bit rate is best viewed on the main monitor, and the second is used to display low-changing images. For example, use a second monitor for surfing the Internet, viewing documents, etc.

Despite all the advantages, the UGA-165 USB video adapter upset me at first.

After unpacking, I decided to try it out in conjunction with an LCD TV Samsung LE32A430T1. But the TV did not “see” the signal from the adapter point-blank and I did not manage to display the picture on it. I tried everything. I connected both via VGA and HDMI, climbed into the TV settings, changed the resolution. Nothing helped.

To calm down, he explained this stubborn reluctance of the LCD TV to work with a USB video adapter only by the fact that it was already quite old. In addition, in the instructions for the TV, I found a clarification that it does not support SOC synchronization or something like that. Perhaps the reason lies precisely in this.

When working at a computer, a second monitor is sometimes required. But there are times when the computer does not have the required D-Sub (VGA) or DisplayPort video output. For example, the candy bar may not have it, as it happened in my case.

Naturally, many are wondering if it is possible to connect a monitor via USB?

As it turned out, a variety of USB video adapters with VGA / HDMI / DVI output or combined are available for sale. In addition, there are adapters that only work with USB2.0, and there are those that support both USB3.0 and the outdated USB2.0.

After a short search, I settled on USB video adapters based on DisplayLink technology.

The essence of such a USB video adapter is as follows. A program and driver (in this case, DisplayLink Manager) is installed on the computer, which has access to the resources of the central processing unit (CPU) and video card (GPU).

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The video stream to the second monitor is compressed and transmitted via USB to a decompressor, a specialized microcircuit that is built into the adapter itself. This microcircuit performs decompression of the signal received via USB and displays the picture on another monitor.

As you can see, this involves the CPU resources of the computer itself, which compresses the video signal. However, it can be quite heavily loaded. If the picture on the additional monitor is not updated, then no compression and processor load occurs, since the control program constantly monitors changes on the screen.

The USB video adapter itself is powered via the USB bus (5V) and does not require an external power supply, which is very convenient.

On the official website of DisplayLink in the section “Products using DisplayLink Technology”, you can see the list of manufactured devices. Among others there are USB video adapters and USB monitors.

The range of manufactured USB video adapters is quite extensive. Basically, devices differ in the supported type of USB interface (2.0 / 3.0) and the maximum allowable resolution of the output image. Typically, USB2.0 devices support up to Full HD (1920 x 1080) resolution, while USB3.0 devices can display up to 4K (3840 x 2160) resolution.

To work with my monoblock, I bought a PLUGABLE UGA-165 USB video adapter, or rather, a copy of it.

As it turned out, an exact copy of the PLUGABLE UGA-165 model is being sold on Aliexpress for a fairly low price. He took it. Here’s what’s included.

This is the so-called Single Display Adapter, that is, an adapter for one monitor. There are adapters for two, three monitors and full docking stations, to which you can connect several additional high-resolution monitors.

I chose a suitable video adapter quite carefully. It was required that it work over the USB2.0 interface and have different types of VGA / HDMI / DVI video outputs. This would allow, on occasion, to connect any monitor or LCD TV.

In addition, I really wanted to get a picture on the screen with the highest possible resolution (HD Ready, or better Full HD).

The set included two additional adapters for the standard 15-pin VGA (aka D-SUB) and HDMI connectors. This will allow the video adapter to be used in conjunction with new LCD TVs and monitors, which are increasingly equipped with an HDMI input.

For completeness, I will show a photo of the insides of the video adapter.

Here is a printed circuit board with not many elements.

Bottom view of the seal.

Onboard BGA chip DL-165 belonging to the second generation of DisplayLink specialized processors.

DisplayLink Manager software

All control of the USB video adapter is carried out through a special program. DisplayLink Manager.

Its latest version can be downloaded from the official DisplayLink website at the link. In addition to Microsoft Windows, MacOS, Android, Ubuntu and Chromebook operating systems are supported.

I have Windows 7, so I chose this system. Before downloading, you need to click on the “Accept” button to confirm your agreement with the license agreement. After that, the download should start. Run the installation of the downloaded file with a double click.

During installation, the program will ask you to connect a USB video adapter to your computer.

In Windows Device Manager, the USB video adapter appears as USB Display Adapters (USB-DVI).

After installing DisplayLink Manager, its icon will appear in the tray. Here is such.

Using this program, you can control the USB video adapter: enable, disable, change the resolution to additional. monitor, rotate the screen, expand the screen on different sides. There are quite a few settings.

I’ll tell you about some of the features of the DisplayLink Manager utility that may come in handy.

By default, DisplayLink Manager launches when the computer is turned on. This is convenient as the desktop immediately expands to an additional monitor.

But, there are times when an additional monitor is not needed for operation. Then it can be turned off.

To disable the additional monitor, left-click on the DisplayLink Manager icon in the tray. In this case, the program menu should appear.

We select item 2.USB-DVI. “Disable”. In this case, the monitors will blink briefly, and the indicator on the USB-DVI adapter will go out.

This will turn off the USB video adapter and enter sleep mode on the secondary monitor. For me, for example, the second monitor of the BenQ FP93G brand went to the duty room with a slight delay, but, as I understand it, it depends on the monitor itself. Dell monitor P2217h went to duty immediately after disconnecting the adapter.

To turn on the additional monitor again, do the same operation as when turning off the monitor, but this time select the “Expand” item. This.

In this case, the main screen will briefly blink, and the indicator on the USB-DVI adapter will light up. The desktop will again be extended to an additional monitor.

If necessary, you can expand the desktop to the right / left, as well as top or bottom relative to the main one. For example, I have my desktop extended on the right, but someone might need a different configuration.

If you expand the desktop from above or below relative to the main one, then you may encounter this. Move the mouse to add. the monitor can only be within the border of the width of the second monitor. For example, the width in pixels of the main monitor is 1920 pixels, and the second is 1024.

In this case, if you move the mouse at the top / bottom edge within 1024 pixels, then you can easily move the mouse cursor to the second monitor. If you move the mouse pointer further than 1024 pixels, then you will not be able to move it to the second monitor. Such is the feature.

For those who have a monitor that allows you to change the position of the screen, the option “Screen rotation” may be useful.

When changing the screen orientation from landscape to portrait, SIMply select the item “Screen Rotation” in the DisplayLink Manager menu and then one of four options to choose from.

You can rotate the image to the right or left. Turning step 90 0.

If you select “Flip”, then the image on the monitor screen will be displayed “upside down”. When you select “Standard Album”, the image on the screen will take a standard view, which is the default.

On the second tab of the menu there is an item “Screen resolution”. Through it you can set the screen resolution of the second monitor. Usually the program independently determines the nominal resolution of the additional monitor, but, if required, it can be set manually. It was detected automatically for me. No further action required.

If you select Use this monitor as primary, the secondary monitor becomes the primary. The taskbar will appear on its screen. This can be useful if the secondary monitor has a higher resolution and you work primarily within the boundaries of its screen.

The item “Create a copy” duplicates the image of the main screen on the second monitor. What I didn’t like about this mode is that the image resolution on both screens gets smaller, and its proportions and positioning on the screen change.

Apparently, this mode is used in conjunction with projectors. I don’t need him.

The item “Fit to TV screen” can be useful in cases where the USB video adapter is used in conjunction with an LCD TV. In some cases, even if the video adapter works correctly with the TV, there are black margins on its screen at the edges. You can correct the position by adjusting the image manually.

To do this, select the item “Fit to TV screen” and adjust the image on the TV screen so that it occupies the entire screen.

A red frame will appear on the LCD TV screen, the edges of which can be moved using the “” and “-” buttons in the “Fit to TV” window. Configure and click the “Apply” button.

There are two items in the main DisplayLink Manager menu: “Sound Setting” and “Advanced Configuration”.

By clicking on the “Sound Settings” item, the standard Windows “Sound” settings window opens, which is available along the path “Control Panel”. “Sound”.

The fact is that some USB video adapters also support audio signal transmission, for example, via HDMI. Therefore, the program has a sound setting item.

The situation is SIMilar with the item “Advanced configuration”, which SIMply refers to the tab of system settings Windows screen resolution (“Control Panel”. “All Control Panel Items”. “Display”. “Screen Resolution”).

You can find out the version of DisplayLink Manager by clicking on “DisplayLink Manager” at the top of the main menu.

If there is a new version of the program, it is better to download and install it, since errors in newer versions can be eliminated.

During the operation of the USB video adapter, some of them came to light. It is very rare for a video driver to fail. Solved by reboot. Sometimes this is not required, the video driver restores its work automatically.

Another “glitch” that was revealed when using the video adapter is the hang of the program, the window of which was on the additional screen. monitor. Hangs occur when disconnecting USB video adapter via DisplayLink Manager menu.

Basically, this is how the Media Player Classic freezes when playing a video. Perhaps this is a feature of the player itself. It was solved by forced closing Media Player Classic and restarting it.

We connect the monitor to the laptop via HDMI cable

It is recommended to disconnect both devices before connecting the cable. Honestly, I don’t turn it off. Nothing has burned yet # 128578; But I recommend you turn off the laptop and turn off the power of the monitor.

We connect the cable to the monitor.

We connect the other end of the cable to the laptop.

After connecting (and turning on), the image will most likely be duplicated on both screens (as in the photo below).

Update: There are many monitors with built-in speakers. HDMI cable can transmit not only image, but also sound. If immediately after connecting the sound to the monitor did not go, then see this article: how to output sound from a computer to a TV via HDMI. You may need to change your Windows audio playback settings.

Then you can change the mode of operation of multiple displays. There are 4 modes in Windows:

  • Duplicate, or Duplicate. This is when the same image is displayed on the laptop and monitor screen.
    In this mode, there is one nuance with the screen resolution. It is determined by the lowest resolution and installed on both screens. On laptops, the resolution is usually 1366 × 768, and on monitors, 1920 × 1080. In this mode, the monitor will also be forced to a resolution of 1366 × 768. And the picture will not be of very good quality. In my case, the laptop is also 1920 × 1080.
  • Expand. When the second screen becomes like a continuation of the main.
    You can put some shortcuts, windows, etc. on it. You can, for example, work in a browser on a laptop screen, and put a player on the monitor and watch a movie. Or open the same YouTube in another browser window.
  • Computer screen only (turn off the pro-rector). This is when the image is displayed only on the laptop screen. Monitor disabled.
    You can turn off the monitor without disconnecting the HDMI cable.
  • Well, the last mode. Only the second screen (only the projector). The opposite is true here. The laptop screen is off, and the picture is displayed only on the monitor.
    I always work in this mode.

How to change these modes and, if necessary, change the resolution in the Windows display settings, I will show later in the article. Separately for Windows 10 and Windows 7.

How to connect a monitor to a laptop via usb

When working at a computer, a second monitor is sometimes required. But there are times when the computer does not have the required D-Sub (VGA) or DisplayPort video output. For example, the candy bar may not have it, as it happened in my case.

Naturally, many are wondering if it is possible to connect a monitor via USB?

As it turned out, a variety of USB video adapters with VGA / HDMI / DVI output or combined are available for sale. In addition, there are adapters that only work with USB2.0, and there are those that support both USB3.0 and the outdated USB2.0.

After a short search, I settled on USB video adapters based on DisplayLink technology.

The essence of such a USB video adapter is as follows. A program and driver (in this case, DisplayLink Manager) is installed on the computer, which has access to the resources of the central processing unit (CPU) and video card (GPU).

The video stream to the second monitor is compressed and transmitted via USB to a decompressor, a specialized microcircuit that is built into the adapter itself. This microcircuit performs decompression of the signal received via USB and displays the picture on another monitor.

As you can see, this involves the CPU resources of the computer itself, which compresses the video signal. However, it can be quite heavily loaded. If the picture on the additional monitor is not updated, then no compression and processor load occurs, since the control program constantly monitors changes on the screen.

The USB video adapter itself is powered via the USB bus (5V) and does not require an external power supply, which is very convenient.

On the official website of DisplayLink in the section “Products using DisplayLink Technology”, you can see the list of manufactured devices. Among others there are USB video adapters and USB monitors.

The range of manufactured USB video adapters is quite extensive. Basically, devices differ in the supported type of USB interface (2.0 / 3.0) and the maximum allowable resolution of the output image. Typically, USB2.0 devices support up to Full HD (1920 x 1080) resolution, while USB3.0 devices can display up to 4K (3840 x 2160) resolution.

To work with my monoblock, I bought a PLUGABLE UGA-165 USB video adapter, or rather, a copy of it.

As it turned out, an exact copy of the PLUGABLE UGA-165 model is being sold on Aliexpress for a fairly low price. He took it. Here’s what’s included.

This is the so-called Single Display Adapter, that is, an adapter for one monitor. There are adapters for two, three monitors and full docking stations, to which you can connect several additional high-resolution monitors.

I chose a suitable video adapter quite carefully. It was required that it work over the USB2.0 interface and have different types of VGA / HDMI / DVI video outputs. This would allow, on occasion, to connect any monitor or LCD TV.

In addition, I really wanted to get a picture on the screen with the highest possible resolution (HD Ready, or better Full HD).

The set included two additional adapters for the standard 15-pin VGA (aka D-SUB) and HDMI connectors. This will allow the video adapter to be used in conjunction with new LCD TVs and monitors, which are increasingly equipped with an HDMI input.

For completeness, I will show a photo of the insides of the video adapter.

Here is a printed circuit board with not many elements.

Bottom view of the seal.

Onboard BGA chip DL-165 belonging to the second generation of DisplayLink specialized processors.

Changing the settings for multiple screens in Windows 7

In Windows 7, you can invoke the menu in the same way by pressing the Win Win P keyboard shortcut. It looks like this:

advanced settings can be opened. To do this, right-click on the desktop and select “Screen Resolution”.

We will see that two screens are displayed. Monitor and directly the laptop screen. They can be determined by clicking on the corresponding button. By selecting a specific screen, you can change its resolution and orientation. Or change the operation mode of the two screens.

This information is enough for you to connect your monitor to your laptop and enjoy the picture on the big screen. It is much more convenient to work behind the monitor, play games, or watch movies. And after disconnecting the laptop from the monitor, you can move to the sofa, or go to the nearest cafe and continue to work over a cup of tea. Full freedom!

If you cannot decide on the connection interface, or you have other questions, then leave them in the comments. Just be sure to write the laptop and monitor model.

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